Easing the tension surrounding divorce and family law issues with high-level service in a stress-free environment.

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Easing the tension surrounding divorce and family law issues with high-level service in a stress-free environment.

3 reasons to mediate — not litigate — your child custody case

| May 19, 2021 | Collaborative Law |

When you and your spouse are divorcing with minor children involved, the kids are the ones most affected by the situation. To some degree, a divorce will adversely affect the entire family, simply because it upsets the apple cart.

Even when the home has been full of strife and acrimony, a divorce still creates a new normal that many children find challenging to accept. When you are, at swords’ points with your soon-to-be ex-spouse is there any way to find some common ground over custody matters? Read on for three good reasons to try mediating your child custody issues rather than litigating.

1. It is easier for the children.

Make no mistake, kids have the uncanny ability to pick up on all the animosity between their parents when they are in the throes of a divorce. Worse, older children can be put in the untenable position of having to voice their preference to the court over which parent they prefer to live with. 

2. It lays the groundwork for a better post-divorce co-parenting relationship.

After fighting tooth and nail in court over custody, it can be impossible to develop a civil relationship with your co-parent. By side-stepping all the drama of custody litigation with mediation, you and your co-parent can learn to collaborate and come up with the best solutions for your children.

3. It costs far less to mediate than litigate.

All the money that you each pay out to attorneys and for court costs and filing fees can instead remain in your bank accounts to be spent on yourselves and the children. After all of this is settled, won’t you and the kids be ready for a nice vacation?

Is mediation for you? If you are interested in exploring the concept of custody mediation further, discuss the matter with your California family law attorney.